Of Fall and Pumpkin Scones

“It looked like the world was covered in a cobbler crust of brown sugar and cinnamon.”

Sarah Addison Allen

Faaalllll. I was beginning to think it would never happen, that somehow we’d been skipped and that winter would just show up one day without any of the glowing autumnal days to ease us into the coldness of winter. But this week our summertime temps finally dropped a bit and there is a decided chill in the mornings now. So much so that I have been in a baking mood for any and all things pumpkin-related.

Which started me thinking: what is it about fall that makes me want to bake? Perhaps, like the quote above suggests, it is because fall awakens certain senses and creates a longing for tastes. Everything about fall can be described in a palatable way, so it should be so surprise then that I would experience an eagerness to bake as the trees finally change and the air grows cooler.

I don’t have a lot of time for baking right now, so I had to choose a recipe carefully. I decided to go with snickerdoodle pumpkin scones and my instinct, for once, proved right. Crispy snickerdoodle crunch on top, light and flavorful on the inside – this scone is the most wonderful combination of fall in your mouth that you’ll ever experience!

I made a few changes to the recipe (the original was found here). As usual, I used kosher salt instead of table salt. I also added a generous pinch of cloves becuase I like the way that cloves bring out and enhance nutmeg and pumpkin. And instead of milk, I used heavy cream, which helps to add substance to the scone (so that it doesn’t crumble too much) while enhancing the taste. Finally, I like to shred my butter rather than cut it into the dry ingredients as this method produces a light, just-right-flaky-and-not-crumbly scone.

The first photo on this post is of the scone without the glaze, and the other photos show the complete scone. You could probably leave off the glaze if you want to taste more of the “snickerdoodle” flavors in the scone.

Pumpkin Snickerdoodle Scones

Ingredients

1 cup white whole wheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
⅓ cup sugar
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp cream of tartar
½ tsp salt
2 tsp cinnamon
½ tsp nutmeg
Generous pinch of ground cloves
½ cup unsalted butter, cold
½ cup pumpkin puree
1 egg
2 tbsp heavy cream
For the Cinnamon Sugar Topping
1 tbsp water
2 tbsp sugar
¼ tsp cinnamon
For the Glaze
½ C confectioner’s sugar
½ tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp nutmeg
3-4 tsp milk

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking sheet with a baking mat or parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, cream of tartar, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves.
  3. Use a grater to shred butter into dry mixture and then incorporate gently with a pastry blender or clean hands until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  4. Stir together pumpkin, egg, and cream. Add to dry mixture and stir until just combined.
  5. Turn dough out onto floured surface. Knead dough five to six times or until dough comes together.
  6. Shape into an 8 inch circle. Brush top of dough with water. Stir together sugar and cinnamon for topping and sprinkle over the top. Cut dough into 8 pieces and place on prepared baking sheet.
  7. Bake for 15-18 minutes or until golden brown. Transfer to wire rack to cool.
  8. Stir together ingredients for glaze (start with 3 tsp milk and add another tsp if you want a thinner glaze) and drizzle over cooled scones.

Makes 8 scones.

Thanks to A Kitchen Addiction for the recipe!

Have a tasty weekend!

Until next time,

Shelbi

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5 thoughts on “Of Fall and Pumpkin Scones

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